The End of Distracted Driving? – Continued

Earlier this week we posted an article about distracted driving and various movements to reduce the exposure.  In this article we discussed a government grant that was given to Massachusetts and Connecticut to spot texting offenders on the road as well as a new mobile application that aims tto prevent distracted driving by disabling a phone’s functionality while it is in the hands of a driver.

We received a tweet from @freshgreenlight later that afternoon with more information to contribute to the discussion of distracted driving.

* Fresh Green Light describes themselves as a “21st Century driving school” with locations in Rye, NY, Greenwich, CY and Darien, CT. 

Here’s what we found:

Insurance Companies HAVE already joined the cause to prevent against distracted driving.  Esure has developed a free app for Android phones that disables various apps and blocks phone calls and texts while drivers are traveling in excess of 10 mph.  The DriveOFF application has yet to offer discounts or incentives to download.

DriveScribe is another free app that focuses on monitoring driving habits of young drivers.  The system blocks text messages and calls while also reporting speed to the administering party.  The app can also detect whether a driver has blown a stop sign or not.

Canary certainly dominates the monitoring aspect of distracted driving, but does little to prevent said behavior.  The app lets parents see phone use and exact driver location in real-time.  The app will also send notifications to parents when their driver enters “restricted zones” that can be established.  This app will have success with those who behave when they know they are being monitored.

We have also found a very helpful map that communicates how quickly this country has adapted safe driving laws in regards to texting and driving.  The map can be found here from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety.

While new model vehicles are being equipped with their own on-board computing systems, the communication between phone and car will begin to optimize for safer and more convenient travel.  Until the day that driverless cars rule the road, there will always be risk for distracted driving, but until then, it is up to entrepreneurs and investors to create safer and more secure solutions to prevent accidents.

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The End of Distracted Driving?

Campaign From Massachusetts State Police

Campaign From Massachusetts State Police

Insurance companies, law enforcement, employers and parents across the United States have been brainstorming a variety of ways to cut down on the biggest risk on the road; distracted driving.  This exposure can take many shapes and forms, from a woman applying mascara in her rearview, a man taking the form of Neil Peart when “Tom Sawyer” plays, to someone consuming an extra value meal that requires two hands to hold.  These however do not distract drivers nearly as much as the main target; mobile device use.

Although car manufactures have reduced the risk with the integration of Bluetooth Technology, the exposure and danger is still prevalent due to the lack of supporting vehicles and inaccuracy of commands.  So far, 11 states have banned the use of hand-held devices while driving including Connecticut, New Jersey, Nevada and Arkansas.  This law encourages the use of Bluetooth or headphone sets.

The Federal Government is serious about the issue and has granted $550,000 to Connecticut and Massachusetts for landmark research on how to spot and charge prosecutors.  The program grants each state $275,000 for methods of spotting such as looking at motorists on overpasses.

Yes, the government is showing initiative to save lives, but this method is outdated, moronic and will have minimal impact.  That $550,000 would have been much better used to develop a mobile application such as DriveID.  This state of the art mobile application is downloaded and disables the device when a driver tries to access the phone.  The software is so advanced that it unlocks itself and can be used when handed to the passenger.

It is only a matter of time before Insurance Companies catch on and begin to give discounts for drivers who download and utilize the application.  I can see this fitting in very well with the Progressive Insurance SnapShot device.  If the companies and government incentivized the use of this software, we would have safer roads, better use for law enforcement and $550,000 back in the taxpayer’s pockets.

Keep your eye on DriveID and Wall Street in the next few years.

Check out DriveID on Insurance Journal.               http://bit.ly/13Ge7cp