Commissioner Change in TX

Kitzman is out as Commission after 21 months

After the long Memorial Day weekend, the Texas Department of Insurance and Gov. Rick Perry wasted no time before putting the confirmation of Eleanor Kitzman as Insurance Commissioner to a vote.

Kitzman was appointed by Gov. Perry in 2011 and remembered by many Senators for having far more interest for the companies and not for the consumers.  Her presumed bias becomes more evident with some of the events that took place during her tenure.

–          Kitzman removed a rule that would require insurers to give fair warning about any out-of-pocket costs that would be incurred for out of network expenses.  Insurance Journal

–          Kitzman declined to put any restriction on premium hikes in 2012.  This led to some of the most profitable years from companies such as Allstate, Farmers and more specifically State Farm who implemented a 20% rate increase in 2012. Dallas News

  • Kitzman and the TDI put off multiple requests for premium and loss figures.  The statistics that are usually released in April were not available until this past Memorial Day Weekend, just before her confirmation hearing.
  • The following are the Loss Ratios for the largest home insurers in Texas. Dallas News
    • State Farm – 47.5%
    • Allstate – 50.8%
    • Farmers – 66.3%
    • USAA – 54.4%
    • Liberty Mutual – 58.3%

–          Kitzman has been criticized for spending over $1.5 Million of tax dollars on consultant fees with a New York based firm. Insurance Journal

After Kitzman failed to be confirmed by the senate after 21 months of service, Gov. Perry appointed Julia J. Rathegber as the Insurance Commissioner of Texas.  Rathgeber was the deputy chief of staff in the office of Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst.  Rathgeber studied at the University of Texas at Austin and earned both her bachelors and law degree.  Rathgeber is involved in other various associations such as the State Bar of Texas and the Seton Fund Development Board. Texas State DirectoryRick Perry

Rathgeber will serve as Commissioner until 2015, when she will face the same confirmation process that Kitzman failed to conquer.  Rathgeber has a clean slate with potential for major impact.  How she handles the steady increase in property rates, the impeding hurricane season and how her office harnesses the economic boom in the state will seal her fate in 2015.

Thank you for reading the blog of AUI, Inc. MGA & Surplus Lines Broker.image

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The End of Distracted Driving?

Campaign From Massachusetts State Police

Campaign From Massachusetts State Police

Insurance companies, law enforcement, employers and parents across the United States have been brainstorming a variety of ways to cut down on the biggest risk on the road; distracted driving.  This exposure can take many shapes and forms, from a woman applying mascara in her rearview, a man taking the form of Neil Peart when “Tom Sawyer” plays, to someone consuming an extra value meal that requires two hands to hold.  These however do not distract drivers nearly as much as the main target; mobile device use.

Although car manufactures have reduced the risk with the integration of Bluetooth Technology, the exposure and danger is still prevalent due to the lack of supporting vehicles and inaccuracy of commands.  So far, 11 states have banned the use of hand-held devices while driving including Connecticut, New Jersey, Nevada and Arkansas.  This law encourages the use of Bluetooth or headphone sets.

The Federal Government is serious about the issue and has granted $550,000 to Connecticut and Massachusetts for landmark research on how to spot and charge prosecutors.  The program grants each state $275,000 for methods of spotting such as looking at motorists on overpasses.

Yes, the government is showing initiative to save lives, but this method is outdated, moronic and will have minimal impact.  That $550,000 would have been much better used to develop a mobile application such as DriveID.  This state of the art mobile application is downloaded and disables the device when a driver tries to access the phone.  The software is so advanced that it unlocks itself and can be used when handed to the passenger.

It is only a matter of time before Insurance Companies catch on and begin to give discounts for drivers who download and utilize the application.  I can see this fitting in very well with the Progressive Insurance SnapShot device.  If the companies and government incentivized the use of this software, we would have safer roads, better use for law enforcement and $550,000 back in the taxpayer’s pockets.

Keep your eye on DriveID and Wall Street in the next few years.

Check out DriveID on Insurance Journal.               http://bit.ly/13Ge7cp